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The Decision to Be Remarkable

The Decision to Be Remarkable

re•mark•able [adjective]: worthy of being noticed, especially as being uncommon or extraordinary

***

If you want to break out of the mold of average, the first thing you need to do is to make a decision to be radically different. Most remarkable people are people of action, and for a good reason: if you don’t take decisive action, nothing will ever change.

But this first step is entirely mental. It calls for a clear decision to rise above the culture of mediocrity. And then, of course, it calls for action.

How do you decide to be remarkable?

1. Stop making excuses. Just stop. No one wants to hear why you couldn’t do something, so make a conscious decision to stop talking about it.

2. Take responsibility. This is the opposite of giving excuses. Take responsibility for your own success, and take responsibility for the success of projects you work on. When something goes wrong (it usually does), take responsibility for that too.

3. Start questioning rules and expectations. Always ask questions and pay close attention to the answers you hear back. Some good starting questions are: Why is this rule in place? Who benefits from this rule being followed? What are the consequences if I don’t follow this rule or meet this expectation? What is the worst thing that could happen if I don’t follow this rule?

4. Find work that you love and do it well. Depending on who you are, this requires up to two big changes in your life: first, you have to find work that you love, and second, you have to do it well. Do it better than expected and people will be amazed.

5. Begin living your own life. This is what it’s all about—the life you were meant to live. If you don’t know what that is yet, start looking for it. Why would you want to live someone else’s life?

6. Take it up a level. Take what’s already working well and exponentially add to it. Grow your business 300%. Apply for the position of CFO when you’re the Accounts Payable Clerk. Visit five countries instead of one on your next trip (or if you want to explore one place well, stay three weeks instead of one).

Beware of Excellence

But watch out: being remarkable is addicting. It’s like regular exercise or healthy eating. When you first start a new exercise routine or diet, the adjustment is hard for a while. But after about 3-6 months of following it consistently, you build up a natural addiction to it.

Once you get used to regular exercise, you’ll feel bad when you’re not doing it. The same is true with being remarkable: do it once, and it’s scary. Do it a few times, and you love it. Stop doing it, and you’ll get depressed.

Many remarkable people deal with depression and anxiety all the time because they see the world differently than average people do. Their own failures and perceived failures are magnified. When others say, “Don’t worry about it,” they can’t understand why someone would think something like that. For this reason, a lot of geniuses throughout history have been chronically depressed.

Those are the hard things—and you also have to think about the critics, the skeptics, and the competition. We’ll come to those later. On the other hand, there are some great benefits to being remarkable:

Community

HELP FROM A COMMUNITY

As you proceed with your plans for world domination, or whatever you want to do, you’ll be naturally drawn to others who have made the same decisions to be different. Even better, they’ll be drawn to you. You’ll learn from them and vice versa.

Whether you live in the Dilbert Cube, the Ivory Tower, the public sector, or are out there on your own somewhere, there are lots of ways to be remarkable. The specific application is up to you, and when you choose to make your own way, other people who “get it” will seek you out.

Remarkable people are all minorities in a world of average living.

Universe Icon

HELP FROM THE UNIVERSE

You’ll find help in all kinds of unexpected places and from people you never knew before. No one really knows how this works, practically speaking. It’s okay; just accept the gifts that are given to you. They are given for a reason.

The Brazilian writer Paulo Coelho put this best:

“When you want something, all the universe conspires in helping you achieve it.”

All you need to do is 1) start something, and 2) stick with it long enough to see results.

Rocket Icon

WHAT GOES UP STAYS UP

Instead of shrinking over time, your vision will actually get bigger. The funny thing about big goals is that they often take less time to achieve than you expect, and once you achieve them, you’ve already mentally moved on to bigger and better goals. As you proceed with questioning authority, building your army, achieving your goals, and helping others, the vision keeps expanding.

This is why it is not much more difficult to grow a business from $1,000 a month in sales to $10,000. The challenge is in getting that first $1,000 together.

This is why artists scrape together a meager living for an average of seven years before being noticed. Most of them drop out along the way, but for those who stick with it, all of sudden they’re selling paintings for $8 a square inch. (And by the way, art that sells for $10,000 isn’t always better than $100 art hanging in the coffee shop.)

This is your personal tipping point—not when everyone else starts adopting a new trend and makes it mainstream, but when everything comes together for your own vision. But you have to get in the game first, and you can do that by being remarkable.

***

Of all the steps required to change the world in the way you see fit, the decision to be remarkable is the most important. With this decision in place, other variables can be changed. Don’t rush this—it’s a big commitment.

Once you make the commitment, you need a vision to change the world. What will it be? Whatever you choose, make sure it’s remarkable enough to suit every gift you have ever been given. Once you decide to defy the expectations of being average, there will be a lot riding on your ultimate success.

Oh, and one final thing: don’t expect everyone to understand your decision, because plenty of people won’t get it at all. Don’t worry about them. Just be remarkable.

###

78 Comments

  • Matt says:

    Great post! This is just the kind of kick in the pants I need. I really enjoy your blog and what you’re doing. Keep up the good work!

  • Bob Lange says:

    Nice post I am going to put being extraordinary into action starting right now.

  • Harlie says:

    I really enjoyed this post. I left my marketing job two years ago and started teaching Speech & Drama, and it’s the perfect job. Keep on writing!

  • Chris says:

    @ Matt @ Bob @ Harlie –

    Thanks so much for your kind words. I really appreciate that.

    Anyone else, if you have anything to add to the ideas in the post, please feel free.

  • Robert Gisel says:

    This post is remarkable. The 7 points are keen insight. To this I would add willingness to sustain any salvo. The willingness to experience has to include any effect that might be meeted on you. That is the ultimate of can’t be undone and presence. It’s what allows one to embody don’t hold back. I’d think that with your 7 points would cover the bases.

    By the way I thought my plan was novel, to drive an electric car around the world with an electric motor home for support. Goes along well with your visit every country in the world. Can you dig it?

  • Chris says:

    @ Robert,

    Your plan sounds great! Wow, that is certainly unique. Good luck with the electric venture.

  • Robert Gisel says:

    Thanks. Maybe I’ll see you in one of those countries.

  • Rebecca says:

    Bravo! I’m gonna send this link to everyone I know.

  • Robert Gisel says:

    I have been sending this one around, like to see more people see the post. It stands up there with Twins and Look Who’s Talking for novelty.

    Chris, have you knocked a few more countries off the list now?

    WhoWouldWrite.blogspot.com

  • Salvatore says:

    fantastic read! I love rubbing shoulders with remarkable people. It makes you want to learn all about their entire personal story. Gotta keep on being me! Best wishes with the blog Chris.

  • Curious here, in your “visit every country in the world” have you been to Alaska yet? Here’s a tip, Canadian money is okay. Watch thte local exchange rate though. Bear survival lessons are on my blog.

  • Anna says:

    Thank you very much for this post.

    I have felt this way all my life.
    Some people don’t understand my desire to always do better, but i keep on doing it and enjoying my time along the way :)

    Wishing you the best for your future projects and blogs!

    Big regards from Denmark,
    Anna

  • Amy says:

    Love this post! Life is meant to be lived not observed from the sidelines. Thanks for reminding me of what is all about!

  • “don’t expect everyone to understand your decision, because most people won’t get it at all. Don’t worry about them. Just be remarkable.”

    I think that sentence deserves a second look. Many folks, including myself, have held back at times from being remarkable because they felt they would not fit in if they were.

    We need to remind ourselves that fitting in to the mold of average may be a good place to hide for a while, but it ultimately becomes a prison, where remarkable is something you read about and never live.

    Cheers,
    John

  • Marilyn Day says:

    I am so amazed at what I have read so far; especially the writing on ‘nonconformity’. An unheard of for women of my generation.
    I so appreciate the work that has gone into this website and the fact that you share with the rest of the world. Just show up.
    Well done; goodonya.
    Marilyn

  • Jess says:

    Thanks! After being handed a booklet-type thingy you wrote, I, for the first time in my life, realized I was not alone. My utter fear at mediocrity, disdain for unquestioned authoritarian figures, and overwhelming urge to live differentally than the majority of people, was finally spelled out for me.

    I just wanted to thank you. I’m seventeen, and reading articles such as these revamp my outlook on my unorthodox life. It’s inspiring and vindicating.

    And its comforting to have the ctritics so blatantly shrugged at here. I need to rememebr this when my own critics and downers step up to the plate.

  • I enjoyed reading this article about the power of being remarkable. It’s a decision we make, firmly so, and you outlined some good food for thought to go about making a remarkable path for ourselves.

    I believe what’s the point of life if we don’t at least strive for remarkable performance? Passion, faith, trust, belief and determination are all important ingredients that go into the making of a remarkable life.

    You, Chris, are certainly one of those who lead a remarkable life! I so enjoy reading of your experiences around the world. They offer a glimpse into far corners of the globe that most of us might not necessarily visit.

  • Amber says:

    An entry that begins with a “Fountainhead” icon, moves on to a Paulo Coelho quote, and ends with the words, “be remarkable.”

    Okay, we can be friends.

  • Truong, Le Hong says:

    Hi Chris,

    Thanks for your post of “The decision to be remarkable”. It is great stuff out there. I can make the decision to be remarkable now. It is easy thing to do, and the 2nd decision is to follow the 1st decision all the way along. Furthermore, I need to take action to achieve this. I can take the first action now is sending this website to one of my friend. This is for the start.

    Knowing the game is important and I think that my game is to be the best seller in the world. I am committed to get more sales yearly and get to know more and more customers. I also love English and want to speak English with an American accent. It seems hard of course as I am a Vietnamese. However, you’ve said that the universe and the people will be along with you. I also love traveling, and my goal to travel around the world for the next 10 years.

    Well, being remarkable is wonderful. I can do more the thing I love to do. I decide to live my life not someone else’s life. May be I have been living my mum’s life. It is good that someone taking care of you, and I can do better now. One more thing I can do is making phone calls to the best leaders around the world, and learn from them.

    In brief, I’m definitely on for this remarkable game. See you on the top!

  • Daniel Edlen says:

    It’s hard. Seth talked about the “deciding”. Sticking with it is hard too. I really appreciate your motivational posts. Kick the ASS! I’m doin’ it. Holding onto my vision. Focusing.

    Thanks.

  • I once called average mediocre while talking to a brilliant man I know. He was thrilled to know someone else thought so too. For some of us deciding or sticking to it was never hard; it was always the ONLY option. We couldn’t stand mediocrity.

    Yes, we used to be loaners. Yes, until you finally arrive at the Truth it can be overwhelmingly depressing to be able to see the hand you’ve been dealt in the world game created by others. Peace does eventually come.

  • Thanks for the reminders! Especially the first one, which is the biggest stumbling block. OK, this is not the absolute best time to start a major new venture, is it? I mean, the economy’s in a turmoil, people are losing jobs and homes, some of us have other troubles with health or family, etc, etc, so … !

    So, this IS the absolute best time to start a major new venture, isn’t it? Like, when did we need it more?! So …

    NO MORE EXCUSES.

  • Only followers worry about what the media says is going on. They look at what IS and adjust for that. The more challenges there are the more demand there will be for solutions.

  • Nicola says:

    And sometimes you just need to get out from underneath those people who only THINK they are remarkable in order to to give yourself the freedom to be so.

  • Pascal says:

    Hi Chris,

    I just start reading your blog and your article. It’s totally reaching me. I really enjoy your blog and what you’re doing. Keep up the good work!

    I’v been living out two amazing and very transforming years and now I found myself back within my life before I left and I even if I’m trying to convince myself that this isn’t too bad, I really feel stuck and that’s not really suitable for me. I would like to be more “remarkable”. However where to start isn’t that easy to figure out.

    A real issue is finding people that can understand what your talking about. The more you grow older, the more you realize that you are on your own and that many people around are choosing a very different lifepath than your own. Sometime, I wonder what’s is wrong with me?

    Maybe you’re right, “don’t expect everyone to understand your decision, because most people won’t get it at all. Don’t worry about them. Just be remarkable.”

  • MAVA KAKANA says:

    I once read in a creativity book about ‘the kick in the seat of the pants’, this is it.

  • Thank you Seth Godin for leading me here. Thank you Chris Guillebeau for sharing your work and clarity on following a path that you are passionate about. I’m one of those artists, always feel I’m on the verge of making a difference, get discouraged (that nagging, ugly little ‘real job gremlin’ haunts me whenever I doubt my work or myself), but never for more than a few hours. I now recognize the pattern. The gremlin is my reminder of how much I treasure my freedom and how attuned I am when I’m creating art or sharing it.

  • Nando says:

    Thanks for the inspiration. (Am I glad I found your site!)

  • wayne says:

    Your words have helped varify my directions. For many years I have had a button that says, “Why be normal?” I look forward to reading more.

  • Deb Barnes says:

    Thankyou Chris. I am retailer in Australia and have an idea for advertising, the proceeds would go to local non-profit organisations in my town (Portland!). I am in the service industry, love helping people and have been looking for away to “give back” for awhile. I am starting small(my town) but hope to develop the idea through country Victoria, maybe even furthur? You have inspired me to press on. Just like “Wayne” I have one of those buttons! For the first time in my life (I am 43) I feel like I belong…. there’s other people out there like me – plenty of them!
    Thanks again

  • This article (and your whole website) totally rocks.

    Sometimes I think we look at ourselves and think we work in isolation. I’ve had many years of constantly trying to form the language to describe what it is I do. It’s not been easy and I never considered giving up and I never will heck – now I can’t. The “‘addiction” you speak of has fully set in.

    I gotta say reading your stuff makes me feel like a such a beginner and I’m twice your age for pete’s sake!

  • Laura says:

    Brilliant! Fabulous! Thank you for puttting this out into the world!

  • Jan Jenson says:

    The biggest block to MY success has always been ME! But I’ve taken reluctance and kicked it in the buns and put on my dancing shoes (wore construction boots for nearly 30 years) and venturing forth BOLDLY into new, uncharted waters. There’s NO ONE doing what I’m planning … I’ve found my niche! Off to LA next week to greet the wizards of my community and begin a new life …!
    THANKS for your extra stimulus… it was my much needed wake-up call!

  • Thank you for this article. It made my day.
    Let me share this quote – “We are facing a mammoth crisis. A crisis of complacency. A crisis of growth. A crisis of people being stuck. And the answer is to do something REMARKABLE! It’s essential for YOU to START. NOW!” – Seth Godin, “The Big Moo”
    Thanks again! ;)

  • Ingrid says:

    I am glad to have discovered your way of living. Thanks for this beautiful article. What you say is very true ! I was reading an article about you in the International Herald Tribune on a flight to Stockholm. Everything happens for a reason. I am a frequent traveller as well, but needed some more self-confidence !
    A big thanks to you.

  • Michael says:

    Just what i needed… thanks!!

  • Matthew Cook says:

    Is there any way to get a printer-friendly version of this? I know many walls around here that should be plaster by this.

  • I just found this post today, and it is a great inspiration to us all. Anyone who ever believed that they couldn’t should read this. We can all be inspired, and you’re right. First, we have to make the decision to become remarkable, and then we have to go for it. It’s amazing what positive thinking and positive actions can bring!

  • Andrew says:

    This post is amazing! Thanks for writing this…

  • Rory says:

    I am in agreement – being remarkable, authentic, individualistic is trait we hope for in all the people we love.

  • Alisa Barry says:

    as I was searching for an answer for myself about how to get out of the box, be a bit more daring in my thinking and actions, and step out on the edge, I came across your site. Ah, the universe does provide…..

    I am amazed how long this conversation is going on since you posted. Clearly, many, many of us want to be more than we are, and more of who we are meant to be and become. I for one, know that I am only limited by my limited beliefs. Although my patterns are deeply ingrained, I KNOW that with surrounding myself with advocates who share a similar aspiration, it is possible.

    thanks for sharing your ideas, inspiration and encouragement.
    it’s a great starting place on the quest….

    Alisa

  • Cary says:

    I could say that I always felt remarkable even when it was clear no one else or at least the minority of people I worked with felt the same way. Then I did a 180 and felt completely unremarkable because 15 years of studying and trying to break through into the career I love just didn’t work out. I take responsibility for my actions that deter the successfull conclusion, but what really warped my mind was I started to consider other’s opinions over my own truth which was actually contrary to all my intuition from a very young age. So now, being remarkable will mean trusting my own opinion about my strengths a little bit more (since they’re quite low anyway) and forging ahead towards the battle against agism in opera. I will not let 40 deter me from making plans to do this as a full time career. I know there are a lot of other opera artists in my boat. 30 is death by opera.

  • Connie Klein says:

    I love your website; your pdfs which you generously share and I need you online
    to help me reconnect with my favorite saying, by Mrs. John Nash: ” I have to believe that something extraordinary is possible. ” That is what this post is all about; the “extraordinary” needs to start with ME and YOU. I have a very tricky illness and each day is sorta extraordinary for me, also. Thank you.

  • anjowi8 says:

    Just read this through the link from your “World Domination Manifesto”.
    Tried the doing three things right away technique…zowee! I’m off and running on a course toward some goals I always thought (secretly) that I could never achieve.
    Thank you, Chris, so much.
    This is powerful and profound stuff.

  • Rachael says:

    Incredibly affirming :)

  • Nena says:

    I found your blog a couple of weeks ago, and I enjoy reading it.
    I would like to add that IMHO no one can be truly remarkable without an unshakable personal integrity. When everything is added and subtracted, a person gets derived to a core – integrity, or lack of it. And then nothing else matters.

  • Thank you so much for this. It’s been three years since I began my journey of non-conformity and I am feeling stronger every day. This was just inspirational icing on the cake. :)

  • Christine says:

    Thanks for writing such a great blog. =)

  • I admire and revere you and your followers for deciding to be remarkable. Is it heresy to declare that such is not for me?

    How I love wallowing in my mediocrity. It is safe and warm and no one hassles me. I take ukulele lessons and remain a duffer who plays only so many songs and rather badly. I take an assignment with Cross Cultural Solutions and spend a week in Costa Rica working in a nursing home. Although the experience is heartening, I choose not to be excellent at doing more of this. I enthusiastically start a vegetable garden and reap no harvest, with minimal regret.

    I see this as unbounded freedom. Being average frees me from the stress of competing with myself.

    I would very much enjoy being told the errors in my unremarkable, uncomplicated thinking.

  • Hi Nancy,

    As far as I am concerned there are no errors. Everyone must follow their own path. I happen to be someone who loves to push herself and see how much I can experience and accomplish. You sound like you know yourself well. I think that is key. Everyone is unique. Enjoy your freedom! :)

  • Nancy says:

    Thanks for the affirmation, Diane. Maybe one of these days I’ll find an activity that provokes a need for excellence. Until then, I’ll just coast.

  • Just last week, I answered the question: “What do I really want out of life?” My answer: strive to be remarkable!!!

    Guess I’m well on my way towards world domination. Awesome!

  • Vinodh says:

    I come back to this post everytime, I lose focus and I get inspired.
    Thanks for being Chris Guillebeau and Inspiring us.
    -Vinodh

  • Omar says:

    Sensational article. Well written and very inspirational. When I don’t work on my projects I get depressed and anxiety sets in as you described in your article. I feel a sense of peace and calm when I work on a project. It’s a breath of fresh air especially when it’s finally completed. BTW read the manifesto and 279 days. Both are great. Thanks for inspiring me Chris.

  • Kylie says:

    Whenever I start feeling unremarkable or beaten by the ‘system’, I come back and read this. It’s a fantastic motivator. Reminds me that even though I can be surrounded by mediocrity, there’s no excuse for being that way myself.

  • This thread magically appeared in my inbox this morning. Did I really make those previous statements? Jess, you said it best.

    I’m feeling totally beaten by the “system.” It’s a paralysis that makes you keep second-guessing yourself.

    All of your statements reassure me that I am not really alone after all.

    Thanks, guys.

    By the way, I live in the Ivory Tower. :)

  • Royd Compton says:

    I read A brief Guide to World Domination last night…….. at 4:30 AM I was still awake!!

    I’m 51 years of age and now wonder what I’ve been doing for the rest of my life. I feel as though I have wanted to live an unconventional life all of my life, but caved to pressures of family, ex wife, parents and all. I gave up & gave in to all of that. i look at my younger brothers and realise that they are living the life I want to live.

    Damn you Chris……. and, bless you ….thank you…..so much….. from my heart. It is now up to me.

  • Ella says:

    couldnt have read this at a better time….lovely lovely lovely…it is hard living a life that differs from the majority of society and what you said that a lot of people who are “remarkable” struggle with depression or seeing their choices as failures – Im struggling with this right now…living my life as authentically and as true to myself as I can – but w/out taking on other people’s judgments of me or of how to live my life…their idea of what one should be doing at “my age” etc…so thank you for reminding me that there are more of us out there!

    in solidarity with fellow warriors out there…

  • Joe Breunig says:

    Wow! Finding this statement:

    Oh, and one final thing: don’t expect everyone to understand your decision, because most people won’t get it at all. Don’t worry about them. Just be remarkable.

    was better than finding ‘gold at the end of the rainbow’. Reminds me of the Scripture verse Provers 16:16 – ‘How much better it is to acquire wisdom than gold; to acquire understanding is more desirable than silver.

    Makes long for more friends that think as you do; fortunately, I have had one since my college days. It’s tiring to be surrounded by people that have ‘no real vision’ for their own lives.

  • Legendary says:

    Love the blog, I can actually relate to this article quite strongly. 6 months ago I decided to step out and start aiming to be “remarkable” as you put it. Just wanted to let anyone here considering doing the same know that that single decision changed my life. My only regret is not doing it years ago, if your thinking about it don’t hesitate; go for it!

  • Chad Lucas says:

    I am definitely inspired. Now on to the first step of actually deciding to be remarkable!

    Thanks Chris!

    -Chad

  • bilal says:

    I too feel depressed when I am not working on the goals of my life, but the thing is everyone around me is average. They don’t understand what I say. I guess I have to ignore them even if they are my family, still on my quest to b remarkable!

  • Lisa Watson says:

    Excellent post. Simple advice on how to make a profound impact on our own lives. Thanks for this.

    - Lisa

  • Trish / CotR says:

    I really enjoyed reading this Chris. I have always know I want to be extraordinary, now I have to get focused and do it!

  • SaraOoo says:

    So I’m finding this two years after you wrote it, maybe the universe thought I was ready now and put me in contact with your amazing blog. Absolutely loved this post, it’s already printed and glued into my journal. Totally amazing.
    Bought your book today and feel as if I’ve found a guru that’s telling me “don’t worry, you are not alone”.
    Thank you.

  • Patrick says:

    Thank you for this great statement. I’ve been addicted to spiritual search for a very long time pretending to myself that it is possible and the best to live without being remarkable. Within this I experienced a great bandwidth of feelings and conditions, from collapsing on the street to great inner peace and a fulfilling time of full power. Once I noticed that being remarkable is just a natural state, a great sideffect of being able to put all your energy into one stream, to be yourself, to let it flow, not to hold yourself back because of the idealism to fit someone elses expectations. Dreams and anxiety seem to be the medals both sides, get the things done is enough to be happy and that means to be remarkable without spending extra effort to be special. Thanks for your courage, inspiring peoples self discovery.

    Greetings
    Patrick

  • steveh says:

    Thank you for the encouragement to get out of the box and to do it well! I needed that. Sometimes I am good at coming up with creative ideas, I am just not good at actually sticking with them. Thanks for the challenge to step it up a notch…or two.

  • Lindsey says:

    I’m struggling to release my hold on my everyday life, and dive headfirst into challenges i would overwise never think to take. Thank you so much for giving me this inspiration and igniting my will to change the world, however small the difference. I can’t wait to begin changing my life and begin inspiring people just like you inspired me. Thank you!

  • Rhiannon says:

    Great post, thanks Chris, for those of us who can’t settle for a thirty-years-working-in-the-cornflake-factory type of life the knowledge that there are other souls who feel the same is immesurably encouraging.. I would just add, age is no barrier to living your dreams. I am fifty four and am just starting to live the life that I want, after years of fear of stepping out or my safety zone and letting other people call the shots. It is just another aspect of conventional society and unremarkable living that tells us adventure, new starts, world changing lives and buisnesses belong to those under forty and once past that point we should just shut up and hang on for our date with Mr G Reaper. Not so, we can live out our full potential at any age. I think women especially get caught in the youth and beauty myth and it is part of my mission to tell them – you can be the person you have always wanted to be. You need no permission from anyone for that.

  • Rachel says:

    For a long time I have been feeling like no one “gets it.” That the way I saw life was somehow wrong because everyone I tried to talk to- friends, family, acquaintances- didn’t see things from the same perspective. I was lonely, confused, and hopeless. Eventually, something resonated and I realized that there ARE people out there who have similar views; the key is to find them. Because like you said, these people are the minority. Then I found your blog, which has been more than refreshing… and although I have not personally met the people I know I need to surround myself with, your writing is a reminder to me that they do in fact exist.

  • chiara says:

    hey chris, i got here by googling “chris guillebeau depression” i made the leap almost a month ago and have been progressing quite nicely when things went wrong today. not that big of a deal but ive been beating myself up over it. because i shouldve known better than to make that mistake. thank you for your words.

  • I am sure I read this when it was originally published. It was just what I needed to read again tonight. The words stand the test of time. And I must compliment you on the site redesign :) Cheers Chris

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