Reset

How Does It Feel to Visit Every Country?

left Norway and began a slow journey home via the Pacific. I'm writing these notes from a Cathay Pacific flight to Tokyo, where I'll transfer on to Los Angeles after staying one night.

After the end of the world in Oslo, a lot of people have been asking:

How does it feel to visit every country in the world?

How does it feel? It feels good. I'm the same person as I was last week, and I haven't been equipped with magical powers or instant sagacity—but it's fun to know that it all worked out.

Read More

Too Late: Notes from LHR T5

Greetings from LHR Terminal 5, where I'm getting ready to fly to my final country.

Yeah. I know.

I'll share more about that over the weekend on Twitter, and of course next week on the blog. I've heard there's a cake and a champagne toast in Oslo on Sunday night, and a lot of fun people coming along.

Read More

This Magic Journey

Everything begins with a crazy idea, and this particular crazy idea comes to you in stages.

You don't decide to visit every country in the world when you haven't been out of your own neighborhood. First you go to a dozen countries in Africa, then a dozen more in Europe, and before you know it you've reached 50-country status.

That's when you start thinking about goals, and that's when you first decide to visit 100 countries before you die.

Read More

Superpowers, Part II

Those of us who are self-employed, as well as anyone who performs intellectual work of some kind for a living, are continuously faced with a dilemma.

The dilemma can be stated in the form of a two-word question: What's next?

Many of us encounter this dilemma numerous times a day, whenever we first approach the machines that guide us through our work.

Read More

If It Matters, You’ll Find a Way

This post was written entirely in the air between Seattle and Anchorage the other day.

It was a bad travel hacking morning. For some reason I was assigned a middle seat in peasant class—the torture chamber of the modern traveler. Alas.

I squeezed into 6B and unloaded my stuff. MacBook, notebook, magazine, iPad, book manuscript, cinnamon twist. I tried to arrange things as best as possible, without sitting on the MacBook or the crucial cinnamon twist.

I felt sorry for myself for a moment. And then I realized the obvious: am I going to complain, or am I going to get to work?

Read More

The “Help Someone for Free” Experiment: Results & Observations

Greetings from the road to Anchorage, Alaska—or actually the sky, since it's a long drive to Anchorage for most of us.

Last week we had a real-time experiment where I invited readers to offer something for free. We received hundreds of submissions, many of them in the comments thread of the original post and many others through independent blog posts.

Today I'll share a few highlights from the original post, as well as a couple of observations on the process.

Read More

The Waiting

“The waiting is the hardest part.” -Tom Petty

Sometimes there’s nothing you can do but wait. You’re waiting on a phone call. You're waiting on a shift in your environment or for someone else to do something. You’re waiting on the world to change.

Waiting is uncomfortable and unpleasant. Even if there's a chance that the news you're waiting on could be bad, you'd much rather know for sure.

Read More

How Can You Help Someone for Free? A Social Experiment

Dear Readers and Amazing People,

Greetings from Austin, Texas. I had a fun time yesterday with many SXSW attendees and residents of this great city. Special thanks to BookPeople for hosting, to Betty Jean for coordinating a large amount of beer and cupcakes, and to everyone who showed up.

Life is good and I'll be going for some of Austin's famous breakfast tacos right after publishing this post.

Read More

Will It Always Be Like This?

The problem is that you want a new life, or at least some kind of substantive change.

You look at what you have, what you do, or who you are, and you long for something else.

It may be a problem of the fortunate, in the sense that you don't have to worry about what you'll eat tomorrow, but nevertheless, it's a problem.

So that's where you're at. What do you do?

Read More